Home Hotel guest The best places in downtown San Antonio to take your guests out...

The best places in downtown San Antonio to take your guests out of town

2
0

Where should I take my out of town visitors? It’s easy – take them to places that are less touristy and a little less crowded, but offering slices of the essence of San Antonio. Suppose you know where to park in the city center. Everything is ready ? It won’t take long. These places are all within a few blocks of each other.

1. Hotel halls. Before your cranky uncle can say, “We’ve got one with an atrium in Peoria,” get everyone to St. Anthony’s Park on Travis, pretend you’re staying there and walk through. from the hall. under gigantic chandeliers. The octagonal tiling is the right thing – the marble came later. They upgraded the furniture a while ago and installed mirrored glass (bad move), but the Texan Impressionist paintings are still in an adjacent hallway. And this piano. And this loveseat. And that eagle on top of a mountain. If anyone insists on visiting the Alamo, take everyone to the nearby Menger Hotel, stroll and have a drink at the bar where Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders cooled off while training in what is now Roosevelt Park in 1898. (Teddy didn’t drink, but loved the city. “It was in San Antonio where the romance of my life began,” he later recalls.) Another famous guest, completely unknown at the time, stayed at the Gunter Hotel on Houston Street, which has a plaque honoring him: Robert Johnson, the Mississippi blues man whose recordings were all made in a room at the ‘floor in 1936 – no one knows which room.

Part of Paris Hatters’ inventory can be found on shelves under posters of famous men wearing Stetsons.

William Luther / Personal Photographer

2. Chapeliers de Paris, in business since 1917. Inventory isn’t cheap, but this place is fascinating, loaded with memories. He provided the cowboy hat given to Pope John Paul II when he visited the city in 1987. Take your friends inside and they’ll look at you and say, “Hey, you really know San Antonio.

Pay homage to the city's heritage as Military City USA, starting with the Monument to Those Who Served in Vietnam, one block north of Travis Park, dedicated in 1986.

Pay homage to the city’s heritage as Military City USA, starting with the Monument to Those Who Served in Vietnam, one block north of Travis Park, dedicated in 1986.

Contributor archive photo

3. The monument to those who served in Vietnam, one block north of Travis Park, dedicated in 1986. It was perhaps a risk, go with a statue depicting the agony of war as vividly as its heroism. The simplicity of its inscription is also remarkable. The statue attracts the flowers left in the fallen soldier’s helmet and dampens the emotions of anyone who sees it for the first time. A memorial to those who served in Korea follows nearby, and the area is attached to what was once the Municipal Auditorium, whose beautiful facade has been preserved as part of the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts and includes a monument to mothers who lost their sons in World War I.

Schilo's has been in its current location since 1942, but its roots go back to a saloon in Beeville that opened in 1914.

Schilo’s has been in its current location since 1942, but its roots go back to a saloon in Beeville that opened in 1914.

Mike Sutter / Staff File Photo

4. Schilo’s – for years it was Schilo’s Delicatessen, but take-out meats, cheeses and desserts are not very prominent these days. The largest German and Austrian flags in the whole city, hanging on a wall, have also disappeared. But the cheesecake is still outrageous, the split pea soup is a good winter option, and they still make their own root beer. Schilo’s has been at this location since 1942, but its roots go back to a saloon in Beeville that opened in 1914 and soon moved to San Antonio. The men’s room is no longer decorated with a framed collection of century-old German postcards of waterfalls, but hey, you can’t have it all.

Marcos Suniga, employee of the Witte Museum, takes his four children to visit the Witte Museum.

Marcos Suniga, employee of the Witte Museum, takes his four children to visit the Witte Museum.

Kin Man Hui / Staff file photo

5. Wait, your guests include an elderly lady who can’t walk much? Take her to the McNay Art Museum and she can sit in the old garden of a graceful house. What, do you have a ton of kids too? Take them to the Witte Museum to see the dinosaurs, wildlife dioramas, and paleo-native archeology of West Texas, then regional history on display in the new wing, and play spaces in another. complex devoted to science and noise. manufacturing. They’ll be busy for hours, then you can still ride the Brackenridge Park Miniature Railroad, just across the river.

[email protected]

A replica of the Quetzalcoatlus, a prehistoric pterosaur that flew over the San Antonio area over 60 million years ago, welcomes young visitors to the Witte Museum.

A replica of the Quetzalcoatlus, a prehistoric pterosaur that flew over the San Antonio area over 60 million years ago, welcomes young visitors to the Witte Museum.

Jessica Phelps / Staff Photographer


Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here